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Home » Young Rider Forum » Horse Problems/Training Questions » Lowering the head


Lowering the head Expand / Collapse
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Posted 1/3/2015 5:43:46 PM


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Whenever Jackie jogs/lopes (because I'm talking for western pleasure classes) she becomes a giraffe and sticks her nose out. It needs to be down a lotttt more. I've known this for a long time, but haven't known how to fix it. I don't know if its due to anxiety or anything of that like but it could be possibly. Also, she gives me a nice jog before we do lope work, but after we do she just wants to go. If I'm lucky she gives me a super fast trot, but most the time just takes off at the lope and I have to pull her down to a jog from there so that's very unappealing in the show area! The second problem is probably also due to the fact that I havent been able to ride a lot lately, but not the head set. Any help would be great :)



-Lilyanna-
~Jackie & Medallion~
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Post #2038836
Posted 1/3/2015 5:45:27 PM


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Unrelated to wp but pretty bucky floaty trotter thinks he's a giraffe a lot
I think he's mentally impaired

mkay but I don't actually know anything about wp so I'm gonna shut up now

~The Bat~

You're just as sane as I am

Post #2038838
Posted 1/3/2015 5:52:18 PM


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I'm not too knowledgable on it but from what I've heard and been taught is that the headset and frame all comes from the horse being able to carry itself properly and not being heavy on the forehand. I wish I could give you some exercises or something but I don't know any. Sorry. Maybe Hannah can chime in. She helped me when I was doing pleasure with morris

Though she be but little, she is fierce

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Post #2038848
Posted 1/3/2015 6:34:08 PM


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It takes for freakin ever.
When the horse is calm and collected and has the muscle to carry itself correctly, the head will a lot of the time come down on its own. But there are ways that you can que the horse to lower its head to the desired position. I have been taught two different ways and it just kind of depends on what the horse responds to.
I have been taught to put light 'back' pressure on both reins and pull outwards slightly and hold that pressure until the horse drops its head, even if its just a little bit. You start teaching that at a standstill and then apply it to the walk, then the jog, then the lope. I am in the process of furthering the training on my horse, Jack, in western pleasure and in other things as well. With Jack this method has been more effective than the method I'll talk about in the next paragraph. Jack picked up on this very quickly at the standstill but I haven't gotten the end result that I am looking for yet. He understand that I want him to lower his head/neck and sometimes, especially when he's annoyed, he'll drop his head all the way to the ground and the pick it back up the the position he was just in. So although he understood 'lower you head' we didn't really achieve what I was after. I have been told to adjust the amount of pressure I gave to que him and not let off the pressure very quickly.
The second way I've been taught is to 'see-saw' the reins. I don't know if 'see-sawing' is a common term so if it's not, I mean giving alternating pressure with one rein, then the other, then the other, repeat. It's really the same exact method, same way of teaching, same theory, etc as I said in the previous paragraph, the only difference is the que. One way is see-sawing, the other way is outward pressure. My other horse, Shaq, was taught to set his head using the see-sawing method. I didn't train Shaq, I bought him trained.
With Jack I haven't had much luck with the que transferring from the standstill to when he's actually moving, consistently. I find that when he's jogging especially, the time the his headset is at it's worse, when I que him he breaks at the poll instead of dropping his head. Either way I do want him broke at the poll, that way he isn't pulling at the bit.
I'm not sure how long it really takes but consistency is key. You have to really discipline yourself to remember to que the exact same way each time, always que them when they get out of the desired position, etc.

Sorry that turned into a really long blab. It probably doesn't make much sense so if you want you can just ask me and then I can answer the question more directly, maybe.


Thanks Abra!

Shaq and Jack
-Brianna-

Post #2038863
Posted 1/3/2015 7:01:59 PM


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[quote]Bri_anna (1/3/2015)
It takes for freakin ever.
When the horse is calm and collected and has the muscle to carry itself correctly, the head will a lot of the time come down on its own. But there are ways that you can que the horse to lower its head to the desired position. I have been taught two different ways and it just kind of depends on what the horse responds to.
I have been taught to put light 'back' pressure on both reins and pull outwards slightly and hold that pressure until the horse drops its head, even if its just a little bit. You start teaching that at a standstill and then apply it to the walk, then the jog, then the lope. I am in the process of furthering the training on my horse, Jack, in western pleasure and in other things as well. With Jack this method has been more effective than the method I'll talk about in the next paragraph. Jack picked up on this very quickly at the standstill but I haven't gotten the end result that I am looking for yet. He understand that I want him to lower his head/neck and sometimes, especially when he's annoyed, he'll drop his head all the way to the ground and the pick it back up the the position he was just in. So although he understood 'lower you head' we didn't really achieve what I was after. I have been told to adjust the amount of pressure I gave to que him and not let off the pressure very quickly.
The second way I've been taught is to 'see-saw' the reins. I don't know if 'see-sawing' is a common term so if it's not, I mean giving alternating pressure with one rein, then the other, then the other, repeat. It's really the same exact method, same way of teaching, same theory, etc as I said in the previous paragraph, the only difference is the que. One way is see-sawing, the other way is outward pressure. My other horse, Shaq, was taught to set his head using the see-sawing method. I didn't train Shaq, I bought him trained.
With Jack I haven't had much luck with the que transferring from the standstill to when he's actually moving, consistently. I find that when he's jogging especially, the time the his headset is at it's worse, when I que him he breaks at the poll instead of dropping his head. Either way I do want him broke at the poll, that way he isn't pulling at the bit.
I'm not sure how long it really takes but consistency is key. You have to really discipline yourself to remember to que the exact same way each time, always que them when they get out of the desired position, etc.

Sorry that turned into a really long blab. It probably doesn't make much sense so if you want you can just ask me and then I can answer the question more directly, maybe.
[/quote]

Wow thanks Brianna. I'll try one of those next time I ride her



-Lilyanna-
~Jackie & Medallion~
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