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Western Jumping Expand / Collapse
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Posted 1/20/2014 7:27:26 AM


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I want to teach my nineteen year old Thoroughbred gelding Storm how to jump simple obstacles like logs, barrels and other trail course jumps. I know that horses know how to jump naturally by lifting their front legs into the air and landing on the other side but the rider needs to teach the horse how to balance. What do you guys think? Any ideas will be greatly appreciated!



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Post #1994481
Posted 1/20/2014 10:09:30 AM


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Western saddles aren't deigned for jumping. If you want to pursue jumping buy an english saddle.

Thanks Abra!

Shaq and Jack
-Brianna-

Post #1994499
Posted 1/20/2014 11:05:47 AM


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Western Saddles are too heavy to jump with. So yeah you could get an English saddle,or if you feel comfortable enough,you can ride Bareback.

Ellie & Magic



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Post #1994502
Posted 1/20/2014 11:33:05 AM


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I would see if you could borrow an english saddle from somebody. But until you get one, you can lunge him over jumps. Start with him trotting and cantering ground poles to help improve his balance and teach him to watch where he puts his feet. Once he seems fit and has done ground poles for a while (2+ weeks) you can put up a super small crossrail (if you dont have the stuff for jumps, just prop up some broom sticks on bricks and stuff. Just make sure that if the horse hits the sticks or whatever you use, that they will fall down so the horse wont get hurt) and just work from there. And remember that for horses, it is completely different to jump with a rider on their back compared to just jumping stuff in the field. So once you get a saddle i would go back to tiny crossrails or calvetti with just a saddle on his back and then progress to having a rider on his back

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Post #1994506
Posted 1/20/2014 12:01:57 PM
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Like Ellie said. Western saddle are way to heavy for a horse to jump with. I suggest if you want to jump maybe try to find an English saddle on eBay or Amazon if you aren't going to do jumping a lot. There is no point in getting an expensive saddle if you aren't going to use if a lot.

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Post #1994512
Posted 1/20/2014 5:18:27 PM
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actually, western saddles are not necessarily "too heavy" to jump with. The tree is all wood (in most) and has no "spring" to it, so it won't be able to move with the horse, so to speak. The horse isn't able to round himself over the jump properly. Not to mention you'll get a gut full of saddle horn :|
Popping over a small log on a trail or something is fine, but jumping courses or doing it every single day? not so much

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Post #1994571
Posted 1/20/2014 6:04:43 PM


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I used to do jumping with a western saddle,but only over small obstacles. The saddle horn smacked me in the gut so I quit. Lol. I don't jump even with an English saddle anymore, so I'm a little rusty.


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Post #1994585
Posted 1/20/2014 8:59:26 PM


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Bri_anna (1/20/2014)
Western saddles aren't deigned for jumping. If you want to pursue jumping buy an english saddle.


Oh, I would jump bareback!

Only those who risk going too far, can possibly find, how far they can go.
Post #1994605
Posted 1/20/2014 9:00:12 PM


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[quote]redluva (1/20/2014)
actually, western saddles are not necessarily "too heavy" to jump with. The tree is all wood (in most) and has no "spring" to it, so it won't be able to move with the horse, so to speak. The horse isn't able to round himself over the jump properly. Not to mention you'll get a gut full of saddle horn :|
Popping over a small log on a trail or something is fine, but jumping courses or doing it every single day? not so much[/quote]

I wouldn't work him THAT hard.

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Post #1994606
Posted 1/21/2014 8:05:43 AM


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I have heard of small cross rails in trial classes. I went on a trail ride in Alaska and there were a couple of branches across the trail and I ended up jumping over one of them, Not on purpose. So I would think it would be good for him to know how to jump. really small obstacles (like a branch) just in case you run into something like that on a trail ride.


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Post #1994637
Posted 1/21/2014 9:28:18 AM


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Jumping bareback is fun. I used to do that a lot. It really builds up your balance!


Think of Riding as a Science, but Love it as an Art-George Morris

Post #1994663
Posted 1/21/2014 3:56:11 PM


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Get a cheap, english saddle or go bareback. I use to go bareback all the time when I was leasing my pony and I only had a western saddle. It does hurt when the saddle horn stabs you in the gut. If you aren't getting stabbed that most likely means that you aren't in the correct postion... Bareback jumping is a lot of fun but make sure you can trot and lope bareback first before you try jumping. Before you jump him lunge him over some small jumps and ground poles.



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Post #1994728
Posted 1/21/2014 4:17:31 PM
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horselover11 (1/20/2014)
Bri_anna (1/20/2014)
Western saddles aren't deigned for jumping. If you want to pursue jumping buy an english saddle.


Oh, I would jump bareback!
Have you had any experience jumping? if you haven't, I would get lessons first. Also you can buy a close contact saddle on ebay for a good price. I would buy a used saddle since you can get them in good shape for a good price, plus their already broke in so no worrying about being stiff. also you are going to need a English saddle pad if you end up buying a English saddle.

 Taylor & Shadow

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Post #1994734
Posted 1/23/2014 11:30:49 AM


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It is definitely not too heavy. I do jumping figure eight with my horse with the western saddle:) small obstacles would be best to jump but you could definitely do that:)

Post #1994869
Posted 1/23/2014 11:54:36 AM


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So he's never jumped before. Would it be hard to try him out?

Only those who risk going too far, can possibly find, how far they can go.
Post #1994874
Posted 1/23/2014 1:29:56 PM


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I wouldn't be on him when he jumps for the first time. Have him jump with you lunging him either in a pen or on a lunge line. Once he learns how to balance himself, fit his strides in right, etc then you can get on him. A horse might jump really big or not jump at all the first time so just have him do it from the ground

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Post #1994885
Posted 1/23/2014 4:39:46 PM
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umm yeah a green jumper+ inexperience rider= bad news


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Post #1994913
Posted 1/23/2014 5:16:37 PM
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how about getting a trainer who can asses how decent you are of a ride to train your horse to jump properly? It's a really good idea.

As far as the saddle, get an English saddle, or just borrow one, possibly from a trainer. Getting a horn shoved in your stomach when your horse takes a jump short or long is not fun.

sara and jetson



Post #1994926
Posted 2/17/2014 6:00:43 AM


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redluva (1/20/2014)
actually, western saddles are not necessarily "too heavy" to jump with. The tree is all wood (in most) and has no "spring" to it, so it won't be able to move with the horse, so to speak. The horse isn't able to round himself over the jump properly. Not to mention you'll get a gut full of saddle horn :| Popping over a small log on a trail or something is fine, but jumping courses or doing it every single day? not so much
^this. Actually lol my best friend didn't believe me that you just can't jump in a western saddle, tried it, and somehow got her shirt and bra caught on the horn and basically flashed a ton of people it was priceless.

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Post #1998559
Posted 3/10/2014 2:29:46 PM


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If you've never jumped before (on any horse) I'd say get jumping lessons before even trying to teach a horse that's never jumped before how to jump. It's like someone else said: Green + green = black and blue. If neither of you have jumped before, don't try to teach him, especially in a western saddle. You said earlier that you 'wouldn't work him THAT hard.' I think I get what you mean, but how hard you're working him really has nothing to do with it. Western saddles just really are not designed for jumping. A log or some brush here or there is fine, but if you're trying to set up any kind of course, it's bad news. One or both of you could end up getting hurt, especially if neither of you have much experience jumping.

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